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CAQ's Attack on English-Speakers Exposes Corruption Behind Federal Bilingual Policy



A Coalition Avenir Quebec (CAQ) government would give new immigrants three years to learn French, or else leave the province, according to party leader Francois Legault.

Legault explained that newcomers would be issued a temporary certificate, and would then have three years to take free French classes and pass a basic test.

The CAQ government is concerned that with the arrival of new mostly non-francophone immigrants into Quebec, English will begin to overcome French.  But, the real problem for the French language in Canada with an emphasis on Quebec is the complete failure of Canada's Official Language Policy that the former Pierre Elliot Trudeau government had championed back in the day from the late 1960's.

When the Official Language Act was brought in it was supposed to be directed at helping to boost the amount of English-speakers within the Government of Canada and in Canada in general who would learn French.

However, anyone who has applied to jobs at the Federal Government and elsewhere knows is that very few of these jobs want to train an English-speaker to learn French.

Almost all of these jobs want someone who is already a native French speaker while being less concerned on their ability to speak English.

The result of this mandatory approach to "bilingualism" federally is that many English-speakers see it as an impediment to getting jobs which results in them not being encouraged to learn French as former Prime Minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau officially intended.

Security for the French language in Quebec and across Canada will not be protected by Legault's fascistic style approach that will only conspire to turn more would-be French speakers away from French.

Rather, Legault and the federal Liberal can better protect the French language by stopping the systemic discrimination against English-speakers / non-French "allophone" speakers from access to all jobs based upon their skills and then endeavouring to train these non-French speakers to become French speakers.  All Canadians or immigrants who are willing to learn French should be provided with the support to do so, and not be subjected to discrimination.

Only certain jobs which are extremely essential to communications should be designated as requiring mandatory and immediate bilingualism.

Québec also needs a better human rights enforcement process to prevent immigrants and visible minorities from being subjected to systemic discrimination which doesn't provide a positive environment for them to want to learn the "language of their perceived oppressors".