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Andrew Scheer Cautions On 'Forces of Political Correctness' in Keynote Speech



Andrew Scheer reiterated his opposition to the government’s carbon pricing scheme on Friday 24, August in a speech that emphasized the Conservatives’ election year priorities. At the gathering of party faithfuls at the Nova Scotia capital, with about three thousand supporters, Scheer explained his vision for a Conservative government in 2019.

“I’ve travelled all over this country. There is a carbon tax revolt brewing,” Scheer said as his party supporters applauded

“Conservatives know the carbon tax isn’t just bad for big business; it’s bad for absolutely everyone. And that’s why, come 2019, my first act as prime minister will be to get rid of it once and for all.”

According to TheStar.com, party insiders told reporters that there was a lot riding on Scheer’s keynote address, given that this policy convention is a springboard for the party’s pitch to Canadians in the lead-up to the 2019 election.

Scheer’s speech which several times addressed the notion of political correctness,condemned the city of Victoria’s resolution to get rid of a statue of John A. Macdonald, he called critics of Macdonald’s policies against First Nations “radical voices.”

“If we look back on our history and our leaders and only see the blemishes, we miss out on a beautiful story of a country that has progressed into one of the safest, freest and most prosperous in the world,” Scheer said.

This statement is suspected to be a shot at Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Sheer also referred to an incident which occurred recently between Trudeau and a woman at a campaign event in Quebec, where the prime minister deflected questions about the cost of irregular border-crossers coming into the province with accusations of racism and intolerance.

Trudeau "wants to impose his personal views on the country and demonize those who don't accept them," Scheer said, he also said he would hold the minister responsible for "smearing and name-calling those who criticize him."

The speech also addressed aspects of Scheer's personal life, “part of the party's ongoing effort to allow Canadians a closer look at a leader who for many has remained an enigma since taking the Tory helm 15 months ago,” reports the Huffington Post.

He regaled listeners with bits and pieces of his own family's history and his growing up in Ontario, He said he grew up in a small townhouse in Ottawa with little income and few luxuries which he says is evidence that he shares more in common with ordinary Canadians than his Liberal rival. In his speech, he targeted to destroy many ideologies of his opponent, Trudeau and his "tax-hiking, rule-breaking, perk-loving, deficit-spending, debt-mounting, virtue-signalling" ways. And he called on his party members to begin to work hard on inspiring support for the party in the 2019 elections.

"If we stay united, if we continue to work hard, if we remain true to our principles — in a few months, the path of Conservative victories will cross the whole country."